Blogging Prompts

 

New for 2021, our blogging and social media prompts have been designed with our members in mind, but anyone can take part – even if they don't have a formal one-place study (see One-place study blogging prompts 2021 – everyone's invited!). The prompts are a series of monthly themes or topics for one-place study activities. Those activities can be any or all of the following:

  • Tweets on Twitter, or posts to Facebook or Instagram, using the hashtags provided
  • Blog posts (for Society members these can be for your own website/blog, or for the Society’s, or for both)
  • For Society members, articles for our journal Destinations

You will be free to use any or all of these prompts – you might look at the topics and see that you can do something for January, March, April and June but not for February or May, for example. We hope that this approach will be flexible enough to give everyone an opportunity to take part, whatever the nature of your Place, your favourite areas of research, or the amount of time you have available.

Articles on the topics written by members for Destinations can be sent to the editor at any time from now onward for publication next year, but where possible please post related blog and social media posts during the relevant months.

Hopefully you will find at least one topic which will spark your interest and prompt you to participate. If not, we’ll have another set of prompts for the second half of 2021 – and you can of course put forward suggestions for any that you would like to see included.

To give you time to prepare we will be announcing the prompts in advance, in six-month blocks, starting right here and now with the topics for January through to June 2021:

Prompts for January, February and March: Landmarks, Tragedies, and Women

January: Landmarks

A prompt for you to look at a physical element of your OPS, a landmark, which could be a building (for example a mill, a prominent institution, a ‘stately home’, or a church – in the latter case be aware of possible overlap with the Worship prompt in May), some other feature created by people (such as a canal, a bridge, an ancient earthwork) or a natural feature (which could be a hill, a river, a cliff or a wood). What is its history and significance? Which people or events are connected to it, and how? You can of course choose more than one landmark, especially if you are joining in by posting to social media.

Social media hashtag: #OnePlaceLandmarks

February: Tragedies

Tragic deaths in our Places, caused by accidents or illness: in each case there was a victim (possibly more than one), a story of how their sad demise came about, perhaps a guilty party, and impacts on surviving family members, friends and the wider community.

Social media hashtag: #OnePlaceTragedies

March: Women

To tie in with Women's History Month, this is an opportunity to blog, write an article or post to social media about the women in our one-place studies. The focus can be on one or more individual female figures, ordinary or extraordinary, or on women's lives more generally.

Plus, for our members there’s another way to get involved: our March 2021 webinar, Women in our Places, will feature member contributions on this topic! A recording of the event will be made available for all to view on our YouTube channel afterwards.

Social media hashtag: #OnePlaceWomen

Prompts for April, May and June: Pubs, Worship, and Maps

April: Pubs and other drinking establishments

Public houses, inns, taverns and alehouses: establishments selling alcohol were popular places. Some were frequented by the working classes while others catered for landowners and professional people; some were largely respectable while others were associated with crime and disorderly conduct; and some were managed by the same landlord for years while others changed hands more frequently. All of them have stories to be shared.

Social media hashtag: #OnePlacePubs

May: Worship

The influence of religion on our Places and their people cannot be underestimated, and there are many avenues for investigating this. What places of worship existed in our Places over time? What was the impact of the clergy (or others who ministered to people’s spiritual needs) in the community – and did they practice what they preached? How did non-conformists or other religious minorities fare? These are just a few of the questions which could be addressed in tweets, blog posts or articles.

Social media hashtag: #OnePlaceWorship

June: Maps

There’s nothing quite like a good map to show the lie of the land, and maps over time can show changes both subtle and drastic. A prompt for you to talk about maps covering your Places – Ordnance Survey maps, geological maps, land use maps, estate maps, tithe maps etc – and what they can tell us about the features and overall character of the areas they cover.

Social media hashtag: #OnePlaceMaps 


For more details of how to take part, whether you have a formal one-place study or not, see One-place study blogging prompts 2021 – everyone's invited!